This is the Blog for my 40-week Engineering Class for the 2017-18 school year at George Washington High School. The class code for our Google Classroom where occasional announcements and assignments are detailed is available through Mr. Applebaum in class or via e-mail.

2-16-18: Shorter period again today due to report card conferences. I finally got a good download of the video and we watched it to 19:30 discussing tunnels, bridges and sewers at key points in the film. Students are to submit a list of these 10 great engineering accomplishments along with a few sentence describing interesting facts or ideas with each section. This summary is due when the video has been completed, likely our next class.

2-15-18: Shorter period today due to report card conferences. Issues with the video. So we discussed the term “creative destruction” referring to how a new technology destroys and old one. For example, the automotive taxi destroyed the horse-drawn stagecoach industry. Students were asked to describe five other examples of creative destruction.

2-14-18: We played a few games that predated electronics (jacks & chatter ring). We discussed nutation, as it applied to the printing press used to print circuits on the circumference of a CRT monitor for early touchscreen applications. We continued Bill Nye's Greatest Inventions in Engineering and Architecture up to "The Handling of London's waste" (See reference link 80). Students are to submit a sentence or two on each invention that Bill Nye presents in the video once we complete the film.

2-13-18: We examined the Duke Engine (reference link #74). We discussed the topics of statics and Dynamics (two common engineering courses). We watch videos a few well-designed railroad machines (See reference links #78 & 79). We began watching Bill Nye's Greatest Inventions in Engineering and Architecture up to 11:25 (See reference link 80). Students are to submit a sentence or two on each invention that Bill Nye presents in the video once we complete the film.

2-12-18: We examined a few internal combustion engines in class and watched a film showing a see-through head of a similar engine filmed in slow motion. (See reference link #71).

2-9-18: Students were given a constructed response prompt on crowd estimates, safety, and risk analysis. Computers were issued so that students could provide a second estimate based on data and methodology provided Dr. Keith Still's website. In order to get the highest grade possible, the written responses are to be handed in by Tuesday.

2-8-18: No class due to Eagles Superbowl victory parade. Go Birds!!!

2-7-18: Having completed our course listing research in class (that assignment is due Friday), students were introduced to the concept of an engine, a machine used to convert thermal energy to mechanical energy. Students were asked to "wordsmith" the term Thermodynamics and to differentiate between statics and dynamics (two courses that are part of many engineering curriculums. We did not discuss this assignment; however, I did describe and show several types of engines: 1 - Internal combustion engines like the two-stroke and four stroke gasoline engines as well as the continuous jet turbine engine, and 2 - External combustion engines like the steam engine and Stirling engine. I showed a Bill Nye video about the Stirling Engine (See reference link # 86) and I passed around a working model that one can buy on Amazon for about $30.

2-6-18: Students were once again issued completers to complete the assigned work from 2/2. Students were shown how to submit the assignment using Google Classroom. This is the last day we shall use the class period for this assignment.

2-5-18: Students were shown two properly submitted assignment from Friday and were issued computers in order to complete the assignment. While students worked, we saw the start of the film Intersteller (2014) to further examine the role of the engineer in society (Matthew McConaughey's role of Cooper is that of an aerospace engineer turned farmer). We got to 13:52 into the movie.

2-2-18: Students were issued a computer so that they could complete a new assignment (on google classroom). Students are to pick an engineering discipline, a college/university, then list each course, semester by semester, that is required to obtain the B.S. degree from that college. See the google classroom assignment for more details. This is due 2/9.

2-1-18: We reviewed engineering disciplines and degrees. Students will prepare for grade a course of study (semester by semester) a list of courses for an engineering degree and college of their choice. We will refine this assignment tomorrow.

1-31-18: We replayed the video from yesterday to its completion. For HW, students are to pick one of the predictions and write a short essay (up to one page) about the history and future of that prediction. For example, if you pick one on human population growth, you can write about the history and needs of our society to provide additional food, shelter, medical care, and/or education in a more crowded world. We watched a video showing an application of 3d Printing for scar reduction by my friend Mark Dillon of Biomed Sciences (Silon)..

1-30-18: Students received a Steganography puzzle to solve. We then watched (up to 4:07) and discussed a video predicting earth's future in 2030, 2040, and 2050, based on current science trends.

1-29-19: We began to create the technology table discussed on 1/25. We saw youtube videos on darkroom photography and magnetic wire recordings. We discussed how a TV image is created using analog information taking advantage of the 1/10th of second retention of light ink the human eye. We discussed data compression as shown on the wire recording video. I began a video showing analog grooves and CD/DVD/Blue-ray recordings: https://youtu.be/GuCdsyCWmt8

1-26-18: We completed the Black Mirror episode. Students were required to submit for grade a written response to the following two prompts: 1 - Predict the ending of the episode (before we finished it)., and 2 - Give three examples of why the technology featured in the "Black Mirror" episode might be banned if developed.

1-25-18: We continued the Black Mirror episode. Tomorrow, students are to submit a written prediction on how this episode ends. We discussed the technology of contact lens eye displays in development. Continuing our lessons on encryption, Students are required to create a table listing the following audio and video recording technologies: Opticaly activated chemical emulsion film, Magnetic Wire, Magnetic Tape, Analog Grooves, Digital Audio, and Digital Video.

1-24-18: Students took the midterm exam.

1-23-18: Students were reminded about the HW. We discussed the technology of recording audio and video as a body implant and what some of the personal, social, and political issues of such a technology would be. We then began watching "Black Mirror - The Entire History of You" up to 28:39.

1-22-18: We completed the Imitation game. Students are to write a personal reflection on the module covering the topics of encryption and decoding and the history of computers. This is due for HW by Friday. We examined the Ig Nobel prizes, the topic of this past weekend's "Science on Saturday" at the PPPL. We learned about the purpose of "Little Miss Sweetie Poo" and examined the work of a few prize winners.

1-19-18: We continued "The Imitation Game" to 1:34:30. We spoke about the circumstances surrounding the death of British actor Leslie Howard in 1943. The information revealed in class is still not published even 73 years later.

1-18-18: We discussed incorporating a few of the episodes of "Black Mirror" into our topic of technology futures. We continued "The Imitation Game" to 1:11.

1-17-18: I reviewed a problem that will appear on the midterm based on a key pad encryption as described in
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCDe14NxSY0. We then continued "The Imitation Game" to 1:08.

1-16-18: We watched more of "The Imitation Game" (to 50:41). I announced the midterm exam on 1/24 which will count as 35% of the term grade.

1-12-18: We talked again about the PPPL, "Science on Saturday" lecture series that begins tomorrow. Be there by 8:30 to get your seat int he lecture hall otherwise you will be in the lunchroom watching from remote screens. Extra credit is offered for proof that you were there. We continued with "The Imitation Game" to 31:45. Journal entry number 1 for "The Imitation Game" is to write two tricky job puzzle questions (and their answers) used by technology companies like Google to screen their job applicants.

1-11-18: We watched a couple of Weird Al parody videos: one to help prepare us for the literature exams (Word Crimes) and, two to help us appreciate feats of engineering (Amish Paridise). We then continued "The Imitation Game" to 30:29 and discussed the use of puzzles as a selection tool for job applicants in the information technology industry. For extra credit, students can write 10 tricky job interview questions used by information technology companies like Google to screen their job applicants.

1-10-18: Shorter 30-minute class due to Keystone testing. We continued "The Imitation Game" to 23:40.

1-9-18: We watched portions of the other encryption video listed in reference item #91. We watched more of the Imitation Game (to 7:30). I demonstrated a method of analyzing the density of digital content on CD's and DVD's using Braggs law (the reflection of laser dots on the ceiling. I also showed examples of data stored on magnetic tape (computer floppy disc, cassette, and VCR tapes)

1-8-18: We are beginning a unit on encryption. We started with the puzzle of how Alice can send a message to Bob through Eve without Eve understanding the message. We watched a video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yFZGF8FHSg and discussed this problem. We discussed the German Enigma machine and an introduction to Allan Turing. We began the "Imitation game" after I read the quote, "Pay Attention...."

1-3-18: We discussed interim grades and scheduling through the end of the term. We completed the 1965 Phoenix video. I played a selection from the Voyager Golden Record set and we discussed the Voyager mission. We began discussion on the technology of the phonograph record.

12-22-17: With reduced classroom attendance due to holiday activities we continued the 1965 version with 9 minutes to go (engine started!) while other students performed makeup work. I went over the items for the Phoenix Journal and provided a written list as follows (The Journal is due today but can be submitted by e-mail before 12/25):

Flight of the Phoenix – Journal Items
1 - List 10 attributes (e.g. parts and their functions) of a winged aircraft.
2 - Create three orthogonal drawing of the Fairchild C-119 (Top, side, and front views).
3 - Create a list of 10 facts or features that compare the Fairchild C-82 to the C-119.
4 – Create a drawing of the Phoenix and a drawing of the C-119 showing which parts of the C-119 were used to construct the Phoenix.

12-21-17: I showed slide rules and dip pens while we contuinued to 1:31 in the video.

12-20-17: We played with an old mechanical bank that Mr. Meekins provided. We continued discussions related to the the Flight of the Phoenix and continued the 1965 film to 54:32.

12-19-17: We completed the 2004 version of flight of the Phoenix. Students were to add one more journal entry, a drawing of the Phoenix and a drawing of the C-119 showing which parts of the C-119 were used to construct the Phoenix. The journal is due by Friday. We began watching the 1965 version to compare the two films. We got up top 27:54.

12-18-17: I checked the HW for grade. Those who did not do it will get 75% credit once it is submitted as part of the Journal. We reviewed the HW by comparing specification on both planes. We learned that range was traded off on the new plane for power and carrying capacity. We continued to watch the film to 1:35. We also saw the crash that killed stunt pilot Paul Mantz while filming the 1965 original version titled "The Flight of the Phoenix".

12-15-17: Phoenix Journal Item #3 (a homework assignment for Monday): Create a list of 10 facts or features that compare the Fairchild C-82 to the C-119. This requires an online or library research of the two aircraft (at a Wikipedia search of both). We continue the video to 1:10. Students who want extra credit can submit a paragraph describing the purposes and procedures of a "Hot Work Permit" in a chemical manufacturing facility as discussed in class.

12-14-17: I attended an all-day, in-school professional development on the topic of "writing across the curriculum". Students were required to read an article on "Fusion Power" and submit responses from 9 prompts for credit toward grade.

12-13-17: We continued the video to 49:30. There was no new journal article today although we did discuss several engineering and collaborative issues as the video progressed.

12-12-17: Students wrote log item #2 for their "Flight of the Phoenix" Journal: Create three orthogonal drawing of the Fairchild C-119 (Top, side, and front views). We used these images to help make those drawings: C-119 with landing gear and C-119 in flight We continued the video to 30.20.

12-11-17: We began a unit on airplane design. The Journal is to be titled "Flight of the Phoenix". Item number 1 is to list 10 attributes (e.g. parts and their functions) of a winged aircraft. We reviewed these creating a list that all can use. We began the film "Flight of the Phoenix" (2004) and played it to 5:31. We examined the overall features of the two models of the "Flying Boxcar", the Fairchild C-82 and the latter model, the C-119. Also, the Time Journal is due on Wednesday. Here are the items required: "Time Log" Items:
1 - Define "Time"
2 - How is a year measured?
3 - Describe the function of the Longitudinal clock. For extra credit, write the pendulum equation and solve for the length of string needed for a 2 second period (one second per swing)
4 - Of what use is a Breitling watch?
5 - Define "relativistic time dilation" and describe the twin paradox.
6 – List the sequence of events, described in the video “The Seven Minutes of Terror” showing the recent landings of the Mars Rovers.
7 – Define and give an example of a technology dependence web
8 - Explain the need for "The day with two noons". What date was it?
9 - What was discovered about the motions of earth that made it necessary to develop an Atomic Clock capable of tracking a year accurate to within one second every 10 billion years? Name three applications of this clock that would not be possible without an atomic clock.
10- Describe the principles by which geologic time is measured. Based on geologic time clocks, what is the age of the oldest rocks on earth?
11 – (Extra Credit) Write a personal reflection on this unit (e.g. What did you learn and how might this knowledge affect your life? What would you like to have done further to improve this unit? .....).

12-8-17: We completed the video. Students are to complete their Journal and submit them by Tuesday next week. The last two Journal Items are as follows: Item #9: "What did we discover about the motions of earth that made it necessary to develop an Atomic Clock capable of tracking a year accurate to within one second every 10 billion years? Name three applications of this clock that would not be possible without an atomic clock. Journal Item #10: Describe the principles by which geologic time is measured. Based on geologic time clocks, what is the age of the oldest rocks on earth? Extra Credit: (Journal item # 11): Write a personal reflection on this unit (e.g. What did you learn and how might this knowledge affect your life? What would you like to have done further to improve this unit? .....).

12-7-17: Journal Item #8: Explain the need for "The day with two noons". What date was it? IN your explanation, give an example of why it was necessary. We talked about The Magellan voyage's lost day

12-6-17: WE discussed the bridge project grades and the format of test methods. Here is a useful link for those who wish to become technical writers.

12-5-17: We continued our discussion of time measurement and watched the "How we got to now" video to 36:55 introducing "The day with Two Noons" I started a Google Classroom for assignments (Class code: s8f6t8 On this site is a homework assignment as follows: "For HW due tomorrow, students are to summarize the two experiments from Adam Savage's TED talk, 1 - How we know the circumference of the earth, 2 - How Fizeau measured the speed of light. These summaries are to be submitted on paper and put in the box by the door. The link to the TED talk video is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8UFGu2M2gM"

12-4-17: Students were asked to write Journal Item #7, a definition of a technology dependance web and examples. Also to list the mid socio-economic factors in the late 1800's that required a greater precision in timekeeping (e.g. The industrial revolution, war, and railroad travel). We continued the video up to the issue of time zones.

12-1-17: A guest teacher covered my classes today because I was at Drexel University, my alma mater, participating in a school trip. Students were given an article on Jeannette Piccard and were required to respond to 6 prompts following the article. They were to submit their responses for credit toward grade.

11-30-17: Students wrote, as journal item #6, the sequence of events, described in yesterday's video detailing the landing of the Mars rover "Curiosity". We continued, How we got till Now - Time up to 27:11. For extra credit, students can summarize the Fizeau experiment along with a drawing of his apparatus, showing how the speed of light was determined.

11-29-17: Students were to describe the "Twin Paradox" as a continuation of item 5 on their time journal. I showed the video, "The seven minutes of terror" which described the 2012 landing of the Curiosity rover still operating on Mars. We also look at space station which made a 3-minute transit directly over Philadelphia last night at 5:35 pm.

11-28-17: Students were required to write items 4 and 5 of their journal: 4 - Of what use is a Breitling watch, and 5 - Define "relativistic time dilation". We watched a video on the latter (See reference link #58). we looked at how to spot the International Space Station using:
https://spotthestation.nasa.gov/sightings/

11-27-17: We discussed the Drexel trip. We continued with the time module. We discussed the reason why clocks run clockwise and the sundial that run counter clockwise. We completed the video about the longitudinal clock. Students are required to add a third entry (Journal Item #3) to their Journal: "Describe the function of the Longitudinal clock." We also examined a website featuring the $10,000 Breitling rescue watch.

11-22-17: We reviewed the extra credit which nobody did. We used the equation to develop a 1-second pendulum then verified the equation by calculating and measuring the period of a 0.43-meter pendulum. We discussed the longitudinal clock and watched about half of a short 7-minute video showing its need and development.

WEBSITE BONUS - A TRIP OPPORTUNITY: You, as a website visitor have the first opportunity to take a trip to Drexel Univerisity for a presentation on Engineering Technology (including lunch) on Friday December 1st during the school day, 7:30 am - 2:30 pm, download, print, and complete the bottom portion of this form and bring it with $20 on Monday. I will help you complete the top portion of the form and if there is no longer room on the bus, the $20 will be refunded. I will also have more forms on Monday but the selection is "first come, first served". Mr. Husanu is sponsoring the trip and I will be proctoring it.

11-21-17: We began a video by author Steven Johnson whose book, "How We Got to Now" was featured in a video series. The episode we began is called "Time" and we watched the video to 3:54 up to the point discussing Galileo's pendulum. We performed simple pendulum experiments showing that amplitude and mass are independent of the pendulum's time period (only the length and strength of gravity effect the period). For extra credit, students can find the pendulum equation and calculate the length needed for a 1-second swing.

11-20-17: Student began journal titled "Time Log" to be submitted upon conclusion of this unit. The first two entries of this journal are as follows: 1 - Define "Time" and 2 - How is a year measured?. We discussed these and how noon was measured and "Einstein's Twin Paradox". We also tested our last bridge. All bridge reports and test methods are due by Wednesday except group 5 whose will group report will be due Friday after the holiday.

11-17-17; We summarized the bridge project, tested one more bridge. All papers are due before Thanksgiving (Group report and test method) except Group 5 whose bridge remains to be tested. Their report is due the Friday the week after the holiday.

11-16-17: I attended an all-day, in-school professional development on the topic of "writing across the curriculum". Students were required to write complete a graded written assignment in my absence, the popsicle stick bridge testing method as described in the paper distributed 11/3 (and again today) and discussed during the last two bridges tests.

11-14-17: Gluing during class time will end tomorrow. Thursday students will write the test method. Friday will be the last day for in-class bridge testing. There will be a 10% penalty for any testing done next week and 20% after the Thanksgiving holiday. Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335.

11-13-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335. We tested two more bridges to an A+ performance. I reviewed in detail, the format and requirements for the test method report due from each student at the conclusion of this project.

11-9-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335. The evaluation forms handed out yesterday are due today for the project and their group members providing two term 1 grades (your evaluation of the project and your partners and your partners' evaluation of you).

11-8-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335. Students were given an evaluation form for the project and their group members. These forms were completed in class and submitted for two grades (your evaluation of the project and your partners and your partners' evaluation of you).

11-6-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335. Students were provided with an update to the format for group report.

11-3-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335. We tested one bridge to an A+ performance. Students were provided with the format for the required test method report each student must write.

11-2-17: I was absent for a medical issue. Students were given an article to read from the Wall Street Journal with seven prompts to answer as credit toward grade. Within those prompts was an extra credit assignment. Students who did not receive the materials in class can get them here.

11-1-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335.

10-31-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335.

10-30-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335.

10-27-17: A shorter period due to half-day schedule. Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335.

10-26-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335.

10-25-17: Students continued work on their bridges at stations set up in room 335. Several groups began testing variations in design and construction.

10-24-17: Students worked on their bridges. We set up workstations in room 335 in order to permit bridges to be built without being disturbed by other classes.

10-23-17: Students worked on their bridge project drawings. All groups are now approved and should begin construction. Glue bottles are assigned to each group and must be weighed before construction begins. Clean up of spilled glue secured component is essential as each period ends. If necessary and bridges become larger, we will build in room 335 or 339.

10-20-17: Students worked on their bridge project drawings. Three groups of eight groups were approved and will begin construction Monday.

10-19-17: I was attending a seminar at the Franklin Institute. Students were required to create then submit for grade a favorite food data journal to allow scientific comparisons of their favorite foods using "Scott's Pizza Tour Journal" as a model. Groups may also have continued work on their bridge desgn drawings.

10-18-19: Students worked on and received coaching for their bridge project drawings. I showed the testing apparatus.

10-17-17: Students were handed the bridge project paper and formed groups. They began considering designs. The materials will be issued when acceptable drawings are produced by the group. These drawings include orthogonal drawings of side, bottom, top and end views of the proposed bridge.

10-16-19: We completed "Making stuff stronger" and students submitted the video sheet for grade. We began to discuss the bridge project.

10-13-17: Students were asked to differentiate welding vs soldering and MIG vs TIG welding. We examined images of these techniques and tools. We continued the making stuff stronger video to 32:00. WE also experimented with Kevlar, Carbon and glass fibers (passed around class). I made fiberglass from glass tubing and showed a short video of industrial fiberglass manufacturing and another video showing some of its applications.

10-12-17: We discussed welding and soldering. I demonstrated a basic arc welder and discussed MIG and TIG welding. I showed a project involving a bent rectangular tube and we discussed fabrication methods to bend without distortion (i.e. filling with sand or cutting a welding). We continued "Making Stuff Stronger" up to 22:54 and watched the last crash test video listed in the 10-10 blog.

10-11-17: No class due to SAT/PSAT testing.

10-10-17: We examined models of face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic solid states. We examined how a small atom might fit into each structure. We continued with the video from yesterday to 16:34. We also watched a few related videos: Comparison crash test (1959 vs. 2009 Chevy), Smart car crash test, and Bullets in Slow Motion. Another crash test video containing lots of details worth watching.

10-9-17: We discussed the strengthening of materials. We examined photomicrographs of metals to examine their crystal structure. I then showed a video about interleaving telephone book pages to model how crystal layers create strength. We also watch two other short videos showing a phone book being torn in half and a metal wrench being snapped in two with bare hands. We began the NOVA video, Making Stuff Stronger and students were handed out question sheet to be completed as the video plays. We got to 7:25 then reviewed questions 1 to 5 before class dismissed.

10-6-17: We discussed the proposed Aquaponics projects and students wrote a personal reflection on this project and whether they would want to be involved in an afterschool club as credit toward a grade. This writing was handed in as an exit ticket (See reference link #127 to watch a short video). Students submitted the Bhopal report. We began looking at crystal structures by modeling discontinuities with BB boards.

10-5-17: We discussed more on the failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. We watched the Ironbridge portion of the film yesterday to lead into a discussion about materials and how to make them stronger.

10-4-17: We finished discussing the Bhopal disaster and the video describing this event. The mini report is due Friday.
1 - Title
2 - What happened
3 - Why did it happen (List at least three causes each in management and equipment failures).
4 - What factors should a chemical company consider when building a new plant?
5 - Your personal reflection on this incident.
We began to study bridge development with the failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge (known as Galloping Gertie). I began another "Big, Bigger, Biggest" series (see reference item 60) on bridges.

10-3-17: We discussed how companies who produce technological products evolve. We compared Union Carbide, who acquired companies sometimes unrelated to their core products, to 3M who developed companies to expand their core products. We continued the video while discussing more aspects of the Bhopal disaster. We learned the term "Going Postal" as we spoke about a companies responsibility to its employees.

10-2-17: I provided feedback on the Engineering disaster reports. The format must be followed to receive the highest possible grade. We continued discussing the Bhopal incident. We spoke about the origins of Union Carbide company and I demonstrated the "Carbide Cannon". We continued the film up to 4:21. We reviewed the safety measures for a gas leak, all of which were not functioning. The plant did not even have an audible evacuation alarm.

9-29-17: We discussed the article from yesterday, reviewed the drawings for the Hyatt report, and began discussing the Bhopal disaster. I started a video describing this event.

9-28-19: I was out for a funeral so, students were given a work to do from the book, a sheet about he development of the aluminum industry with 5 questions to submit.

9-27-17: We complete the video and discussion covering the Hyatt walkway collapse. The mini-report as specified yesterday is due Friday. We also discussed the findings of blame for the sinking of the Lusitania as discussed in the book "Dead Wake"

9-26-17: We began a discussion and video about the Hyatt Regency Walkway collapse of 1981. Students will be required to submit a mini report in the same form as before with the added requirement of isometric drawings of the failure point, "as designed" and "as built".

9-25-17: Students are required to submit their mini report on the New London School House Explosion. The next report will be on the Hyatt Regency Walkway collapse. Please talk some time to find out some information about it. We examined and tested a new design for the bicycle wheel gyroscope. We discussed and toured Room 18 where Mr. Wiley's new hydroponics facility will be located. In the process of the tour and discussion afterward, students learned a little about asbestos, asbestosis, asbestos abatement, asbestos litigation, the Johns Manville bankruptcy, and asbestos alternatives.

9-20-17: We reviewed the work from yesterday, completing the video. We discussed the use of methyl mercaptan, used to add odor to fuel gases. We also explored the Mcmaster Carr website and the hard copy catalog. I offered extra credit to students who use a 3D printer at a local library and showed how to find those facilities. Students are to complete the mini report on the New London Schoolhouse explosion by Monday.

9-19-17: Students received credit toward grade for the orthogonal drawings they made yesterday of the rubber stopper. For additional practice, students drew three views of a nut and bolt assembly (top, side, bottom). We examined similar drawings on the McMaster Carr Website (a hex nut and a toggle clamp). We began a unit on engineering disasters, the first being the disaster presented in a video on the New London School House Explosion. For each disaster presented, students are required to write a mini report in the following format:
1 - Title
2 - What happened
3 - Why did it happen
4 - What was done to prevent this from happening again.
5 - Your personal reflection on this incident.
These reports are due on the day after we finish the discussion and move onto the next disaster or unit topic.

9-18-17: Students were given a rubber stopper and asked to create a six-view isometric drawing as part of their grade. We discussed hidden lines. I showed several drawing from an internet search of isometric drawing images. I replicated the assignment on the board and began adding dimensions. I will check student drawing tomorrow.

9-15-17: Students handed in their Journal for grade. It will lose 10% for each day late up to Wednesday next week if not turned in today. Students were given four key terms for the next unit on Material Science: Tension, Compression, Shear, and Fatigue. We discussed each and created descriptive failures using steel and glass as examples. We examined the structure of an "I" beam, defined fibers (L/D>100) and examined pressed fiber board, discussing some of its application. I used "The Sponge of Learning" to help with some of these concepts.

9-14-17: We discussed modular construction, the last design feature of the Nimitz Class Carriers. Journalare due tomorrow and are to be composed of the following sections: 1 - List 10 attributes of a Aircraft Carrier; 2 - List each of the seven ships discussed in the film along with 8 facts about each one. These ships are (in order): USS North Carolina, HMS Ark Royal, USS Hornet, USS Midway, USS Forrestal, USS Enterprise, USS H.W. Bush (or any of the "Nimitz" class carriers). 3 - List the seven major developments in aircraft carrier design along with the name of the ship that represents that new technology.

9-13-17: Students were asked to list the seven ships covered int eh Aircraft Carrier video along with the major developmental step that each represented in the technology of building aircraft carriers. We continued the video, nearly to the end, 40:46. Journals will be due Friday.

9-12-17: Students were asked to define, as part of their journal, the ship building words: Laid down, launched, shakedown, commission, and operational. We continued the video to 26.25; just entering the topic of guidance.

9-11-17: I provide students with a list of the remaining ships covered by the video. For HW, due as part of the Journal submission when the video is complete, students are to list 8 facts about each ship in their Journal. The ships are: USS North Carolina, HMS Ark Royal, USS Hornet, USS Midway, USS Forestal, USS Enterprise, USS H.W. Bush (or any of the "Nimitz" class carriers). We continued the video to 15:02 with discussions. We spoke briefly about the Space shuttle program (another USS Enterprise - this one named after the fictional starship from Star Trek) and distinguished between the designation HMS and USS in the names of these ships.

9-8-17: We constructed and tested the stability of a large gyroscope from a bicycle wheel with handles and a sand filled tube. We continued our discussion of aircraft carriers by discussing facts about the earliest ship featured in the film, the ARC-12 (USS North Carolina). We talked about its trip to take US president Taft to the Panama Canal and discussed the history and technical challenges of the Canal as many students were not familiar with it. We continued the video to 9:24.

9-7-17: Students continued their Journal creating an outline with space for eight facts for each of the seven ships featured in the video. We briefly discussed the development of the Wright brother's flyer. Students also learned how to get a free airplane flight through the Young Eagles program (See reference item #29). We continued the video into the discussion of the problem of taking off. For HW students are to find their facts for the USS North Carolina (the ship first used to launch aircraft around 1916. This information is to be included in the Journal.

9-6-17: Students submitted their HW for a grade. We began discussing the role of the engineer in society. AS an example of a large engineering project we shall focus on the Aircraft Carrier. Students began a log (or Journal) to be handed in at the conclusion of a video, Big, Bigger, Biggest - Aircraft Carriers (Video is linked in this site as item #60 on the reference tab on the left). As Item one in the Journal, students were asked to write 10 attributes of an aircraft carrier. We discussed several in class. The I began the video. We got to 1:24.

9-5-17: First day of class. I hope you felt welcome and enthused about the subject. Students received a hard copy print of the syllabus to keep in their notebook and were assigned seats. Note: The syllabus is available in digital format as item #1 on the tab titled "Assignments /EC" on the left. We discussed the engineering career and I demonstrated center of mass. Your homework tonight is to Complete the two-part prompt handed out in class.